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CEO

Seven Tips to Leverage Long-Term Employment on Your Resume

We get a lot of questions on the Resume Tips Forum from job seekers asking how to handle job-hopping and long periods of unemployment on their resumes. But occasionally, someone asks the flip side: how to handle long-term employment with one company. With so much disruption in the labor force and many workers eager to jump at better jobs, employees who stay with one company for a significant amount of time may wonder, “Am I a dinosaur?”

The answer, of course, is no. The key is to present your long-term work history as a positive attribute, proof you’re in for the long haul. Recruiting a new employee is an expensive endeavor — companies are always looking for ways to promote long-term tenure — so demonstrate you are a worthwhile investment. If you would like to use your solid work history as a selling point, here are seven ways to enhance your resume:

1. Keep Learning

Some employers might view your long-term employment as an indication that your skills have stagnated. Prove them wrong by constantly refreshing your skills through formal education and self-study. Participate in professional-development courses sponsored by your employer or paid for out-of-pocket. Create a Professional Development section on your resume to list your ongoing education.

2. Remove Outdated Skills and Credentials

Obsolete skills are a sure sign of a dinosaur, so omit them. If you aren’t sure, ask a trusted colleague or potential hiring manager whether a particular skill is still current. You can also glean this information by scouring job ads; if the skill isn’t included in job postings, you should probably take it out.

3. List Different Positions Separately

Promotions illustrate that your company realized your worth and offered you more responsibility. Even lateral moves indicate your employer recognized your diverse talents. Instead of grouping all of your positions under one heading, give your positions individual descriptions along with distinct time periods. Reinforce your internal mobility with terms such as “promoted to” or “selected by CEO to assist with a new department startup.”

If you’ve been in the same position for your entire tenure, show how you’ve grown in this position and made a difference to the organization. To jog your memory, think about how your current job duties differ from when you first started.

4. Display Accomplishments

Your employment description should go beyond merely listing job duties. To get noticed in a competitive job market, your resume should feature a track record of accomplishments. If you feel stifled in your current position, volunteer for a project outside your core competency to experience new challenges and develop new skills.

5. Use Your Employment History to Your Advantage

Use longevity, dedication, commitment, loyalty and perseverance as selling points, both on your resume and in interviews. You also have the advantage of having seen your accomplishments through from beginning to end.

6. Highlight Experiences Related to Your Goal

If you’ve been with a company for many years, chances are that you boast a long list of achievements. However, your resume should present only the experience, skills and training related to your current goal. Since a resume is a marketing piece rather than a career history, don’t feel that your resume must cover every detail of your career. Edit your experience so your resume is tailored to your current job target.

7. Create a Career Summary Section

A well-written qualifications summary at the beginning of your resume will present your career in a positive light. The summary provides an initial hard sell, demonstrating you are highly qualified for your stated goal.

Conducting a job search after a long period with one company can seem daunting, but realize that your experience provides you with skills that your next employer will value.

How to Use Facebook to Land a Job

2193213362_b5d556491eIt isn’t just the volume of users that makes Facebook an attractive source of hiring and research – it’s also the fact that 70 percent of Facebook users engage daily, versus only 13 percent of LinkedIn users, according to a 2015 Pew Research study. While many job seekers consider LinkedIn to be the professional network and place to be, it isn’t the only social network recruiters will look at. According to Jobvite’s 2014 Social Recruiting Survey, 66 percent of recruiters reported using Facebook to recrtuit.

Conduct an audit. Head over to Google or your favorite search engine and search for your name. Take note of what appears on the first page of search results. Chances are, you will see a listing that says “[Your name] Profiles | Facebook.” Click on this link, and you will see the Facebook profiles of people with your name.

Next, look at your status updates. Do your posts have a globe next to the date? If so, your update is public, which means anyone and everyone can see your update and comments others have added. If you do not want certain status updates to be public, you can change your settings by clicking on the inverted triangle and changing the post to “Friends.”

Know your privacy settings. Facebook has a reputation for changing privacy setting criteria. If you haven’t looked at yours in awhile, it would be wise to do so. You can change privacy settings for “Who can see my stuff,” “Who can contact me” and “Who can look me up.” If you do not want people to be able to search for you by email or phone number, adjust those settings. You can also prevent your profile from showing up in search engine results by removing that criteria.

“Job seekers think that their profiles on platforms like Facebook are private and that hiring managers can’t find them. This is not always the case,” says Lisa Brown Morton, President and CEO of Nonprofit HR. Know your settings, but a better strategy is to be careful about what you post.

Stay professional. “Oversharing and acting unprofessional is also a common mistake many job seekers make,” Morton says. “As a rule of thumb, if you wouldn’t show it [to] your grandmother or put it on your résumé, you shouldn’t put it on social media.” Avoid using profanity, sharing provocative or inappropriate photos or speaking negatively about your current or past employer.

Find job leads. Facebook isn’t a job board, but you can use its Groups feature to find people posting jobs in your field and geographic area. Chris Russell, recruiter and founder of CareerCloud, recommends searching Facebook by using your city and the word “jobs” to find groups that share job leads.

Fill out your profile. If you are going to become more active on Facebook for your job search, one way to enhance your profile is to add past work history and professionals skills to the “About” sections of your profile.

Network. Have you stayed connected with your college classmates? What about other alumni? Be sure you’ve added your college and even high school information if you want others to know what schools you attended. Consider joining Facebook groups for alumni as well.

Participate in discussions in groups or communities by your occupation, and “like” a company’s page or join its career group to interact with employees managing those accounts. You can also search Facebook for people who work at your dream company. In the Facebook search bar, start typing “people who work at {insert name of company}.” You can see who works there and who your mutual friends are.

Leverage social media. “By failing to have an active digital presence, job seekers miss opportunities to build up their professional profiles and find job opportunities their competition is likely taking advantage of,” Morton says. Socially savvy job seekers will have an advantage over those who are not active.

Every day people are using social networking platforms such as Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter and Instagram. Your connections with people on these networks could potentially turn into a new job if you use them appropriately. Remember: Companies prefer to hire referrals and people they know.

Hannah Morgan writes and speaks on career topics and job search trends on her blog Career Sherpa. She is the author of “The Infographic Résumé” and co-author of “Social Networking for Business Success.”